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Bloodborne Pathogens

Please review the Bloodborne Pathogens material below. When you have finished, click the Bloodborne Pathogens Test link. A printable version of this material is linked at the bottom of the page.

Bloodborne Pathogens training is provided for all employees with occupational exposure.

Training is offered at the following intervals:

  • After hire and prior to assignment of tasks where occupational exposure may take place.
  • When new task or procedures that affect the employee’s occupational exposure are modified
  • Within one year of their previous training thereafter if providing patient care for the agency.

Transmission of blood borne pathogens can be prevented.

Bloodborne pathogens facts

  • Common: HIV, HBV, HCV (Hepatitis B, C Virus)
  • Others: Herpes, Hepatitis D, Diphtheria
  • Other infectious location of pathogens may be in the semen, vaginal secretions, saliva.
  • Healthcare personnel are at risk
  • Employees that handle regulated or contaminated waste are at risk

Transmission of infection most likely occurs with exposure to broken skin or mucous membranes. Use standard/universal precautions & protection guidelines:

  • Hand hygiene
  • Personal protective equipment (gloves, masks, gowns, eye shields)
  • Clean work area
  • Disinfect surfaces
  • No eating in client care area
  • Avoid excessive direct handling of contaminated items such as laundry

Report all exposures to the RN CM or DON.

Transmission precautions

  • Airborne precautions-prevent dust or small air particles
  • Droplet precautions- prevent large particles in air from coughing, sneezing, suctioning
  • Contact precautions- prevent object to skin, or skin to skin

USE PERSONAL PROTECTION EQUIPMENT

  • PPE provides a barrier between you and any blood or other potentially infectious materials that you might otherwise touch or inhale, or that may soak through your clothes.
  • It is PHI’s responsibility to provide appropriate PPE for it’s employees that may be exposed to infectious materials

USE HAND HYGIENE

  • Before and after patient contact
  • Before putting on gloves and after taking them off
  • Before doing an invasive procedure, such as inserting a catheter
  • After touching blood or other potentially infectious materials- even if you wore gloves
  • Between different procedures on the same patient

After touching any potentially contaminated object – even if you wore gloves

WASH YOUR HANDS WITH SOAP AND WATER

  • When they look or feel dirty
  • After using the bathroom
  • Before and after preparing food
  • Before and after eating
  • After coughing or sneezing into your hands or blowing your nose

USE SHARPS PRECAUTIONS

  • Sharps are any object that can cut or puncture skin
  • Any sharp contaminated with blood or other potentially infected materials can transfer bloodborne and other pathogens from one person to another

USE PROPER DISPOSAL

  • Never bend or break needles
  • Never recap a needle unless no alternative can be found
  • Never aim a needle at yourself or recap a needle with two hands
  • After use, place all disposable sharps in an approved collection containers
  • Don’t walk around with uncapped needles or sharp tools

REPORT ALL EXPOSURES IMMEDIATELY FOR TREATMENT.  WE CARE ABOUT YOUR HEALTH

  • An exposure incident is any time blood or other potentially infectious materials come in contact with a worker’ s eyes, nose, mouth or skin through a needlestick, splash or other type of exposure.
  • If you are exposed:  Wash the affected area with warm water and soap at once.
  • If mouth or eye exposure then thoroughly rinse out your mouth with water or mouthwash; flush eyes with warm water or a saline solution.
  • Consider having your blood tested. You can refuse to have your blood tested. You can also have blood drawn and stored for at least 90 days, in case you decide to have a blood test done later